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Core Configuration

Spring Boot 2.x Sample

Spring Boot 2.x brings full auto-configuration capabilities for OAuth 2.0 Login.

This section shows how to configure the OAuth 2.0 Login sample using Google as the Authentication Provider and covers the following topics:

Initial setup

To use Google’s OAuth 2.0 authentication system for login, you must set up a project in the Google API Console to obtain OAuth 2.0 credentials.

Google’s OAuth 2.0 implementation for authentication conforms to the OpenID Connect 1.0 specification and is OpenID Certified.

Follow the instructions on the OpenID Connect page, starting in the section, "Setting up OAuth 2.0".

After completing the "Obtain OAuth 2.0 credentials" instructions, you should have a new OAuth Client with credentials consisting of a Client ID and a Client Secret.

Setting the redirect URI

The redirect URI is the path in the application that the end-user’s user-agent is redirected back to after they have authenticated with Google and have granted access to the OAuth Client (created in the previous step) on the Consent page.

In the "Set a redirect URI" sub-section, ensure that the Authorized redirect URIs field is set to localhost:8080/login/oauth2/code/google.

The default redirect URI template is {baseUrl}/login/oauth2/code/{registrationId}. The registrationId is a unique identifier for the ClientRegistration.
If the OAuth Client is running behind a proxy server, it is recommended to check Proxy Server Configuration to ensure the application is correctly configured. Also, see the supported URI template variables for redirect-uri.

Configure application.yml

Now that you have a new OAuth Client with Google, you need to configure the application to use the OAuth Client for the authentication flow. To do so:

  1. Go to application.yml and set the following configuration:

    spring:
      security:
        oauth2:
          client:
            registration:	(1)
              google:	(2)
                client-id: google-client-id
                client-secret: google-client-secret
    Example 1. OAuth Client properties
    1 spring.security.oauth2.client.registration is the base property prefix for OAuth Client properties.
    2 Following the base property prefix is the ID for the ClientRegistration, such as google.
  2. Replace the values in the client-id and client-secret property with the OAuth 2.0 credentials you created earlier.

Boot up the application

Launch the Spring Boot 2.x sample and go to localhost:8080. You are then redirected to the default auto-generated login page, which displays a link for Google.

Click on the Google link, and you are then redirected to Google for authentication.

After authenticating with your Google account credentials, the next page presented to you is the Consent screen. The Consent screen asks you to either allow or deny access to the OAuth Client you created earlier. Click Allow to authorize the OAuth Client to access your email address and basic profile information.

At this point, the OAuth Client retrieves your email address and basic profile information from the UserInfo Endpoint and establishes an authenticated session.

Spring Boot 2.x Property Mappings

The following table outlines the mapping of the Spring Boot 2.x OAuth Client properties to the ClientRegistration properties.

Spring Boot 2.x ClientRegistration

spring.security.oauth2.client.registration.[registrationId]

registrationId

spring.security.oauth2.client.registration.[registrationId].client-id

clientId

spring.security.oauth2.client.registration.[registrationId].client-secret

clientSecret

spring.security.oauth2.client.registration.[registrationId].client-authentication-method

clientAuthenticationMethod

spring.security.oauth2.client.registration.[registrationId].authorization-grant-type

authorizationGrantType

spring.security.oauth2.client.registration.[registrationId].redirect-uri

redirectUri

spring.security.oauth2.client.registration.[registrationId].scope

scopes

spring.security.oauth2.client.registration.[registrationId].client-name

clientName

spring.security.oauth2.client.provider.[providerId].authorization-uri

providerDetails.authorizationUri

spring.security.oauth2.client.provider.[providerId].token-uri

providerDetails.tokenUri

spring.security.oauth2.client.provider.[providerId].jwk-set-uri

providerDetails.jwkSetUri

spring.security.oauth2.client.provider.[providerId].issuer-uri

providerDetails.issuerUri

spring.security.oauth2.client.provider.[providerId].user-info-uri

providerDetails.userInfoEndpoint.uri

spring.security.oauth2.client.provider.[providerId].user-info-authentication-method

providerDetails.userInfoEndpoint.authenticationMethod

spring.security.oauth2.client.provider.[providerId].user-name-attribute

providerDetails.userInfoEndpoint.userNameAttributeName

A ClientRegistration can be initially configured using discovery of an OpenID Connect Provider’s Configuration endpoint or an Authorization Server’s Metadata endpoint, by specifying the spring.security.oauth2.client.provider.[providerId].issuer-uri property.

CommonOAuth2Provider

CommonOAuth2Provider pre-defines a set of default client properties for a number of well known providers: Google, GitHub, Facebook, and Okta.

For example, the authorization-uri, token-uri, and user-info-uri do not change often for a Provider. Therefore, it makes sense to provide default values in order to reduce the required configuration.

As demonstrated previously, when we configured a Google client, only the client-id and client-secret properties are required.

The following listing shows an example:

spring:
  security:
    oauth2:
      client:
        registration:
          google:
            client-id: google-client-id
            client-secret: google-client-secret
The auto-defaulting of client properties works seamlessly here because the registrationId (google) matches the GOOGLE enum (case-insensitive) in CommonOAuth2Provider.

For cases where you may want to specify a different registrationId, such as google-login, you can still leverage auto-defaulting of client properties by configuring the provider property.

The following listing shows an example:

spring:
  security:
    oauth2:
      client:
        registration:
          google-login:	(1)
            provider: google	(2)
            client-id: google-client-id
            client-secret: google-client-secret
1 The registrationId is set to google-login.
2 The provider property is set to google, which will leverage the auto-defaulting of client properties set in CommonOAuth2Provider.GOOGLE.getBuilder().

Configuring Custom Provider Properties

There are some OAuth 2.0 Providers that support multi-tenancy, which results in different protocol endpoints for each tenant (or sub-domain).

For example, an OAuth Client registered with Okta is assigned to a specific sub-domain and have their own protocol endpoints.

For these cases, Spring Boot 2.x provides the following base property for configuring custom provider properties: spring.security.oauth2.client.provider.[providerId].

The following listing shows an example:

spring:
  security:
    oauth2:
      client:
        registration:
          okta:
            client-id: okta-client-id
            client-secret: okta-client-secret
        provider:
          okta:	(1)
            authorization-uri: https://your-subdomain.oktapreview.com/oauth2/v1/authorize
            token-uri: https://your-subdomain.oktapreview.com/oauth2/v1/token
            user-info-uri: https://your-subdomain.oktapreview.com/oauth2/v1/userinfo
            user-name-attribute: sub
            jwk-set-uri: https://your-subdomain.oktapreview.com/oauth2/v1/keys
1 The base property (spring.security.oauth2.client.provider.okta) allows for custom configuration of protocol endpoint locations.

Overriding Spring Boot 2.x Auto-configuration

The Spring Boot 2.x auto-configuration class for OAuth Client support is OAuth2ClientAutoConfiguration.

It performs the following tasks:

  • Registers a ClientRegistrationRepository @Bean composed of ClientRegistration(s) from the configured OAuth Client properties.

  • Registers a SecurityFilterChain @Bean and enables OAuth 2.0 Login through httpSecurity.oauth2Login().

If you need to override the auto-configuration based on your specific requirements, you may do so in the following ways:

Register a ClientRegistrationRepository @Bean

The following example shows how to register a ClientRegistrationRepository @Bean:

Java
@Configuration
public class OAuth2LoginConfig {

	@Bean
	public ClientRegistrationRepository clientRegistrationRepository() {
		return new InMemoryClientRegistrationRepository(this.googleClientRegistration());
	}

	private ClientRegistration googleClientRegistration() {
		return ClientRegistration.withRegistrationId("google")
			.clientId("google-client-id")
			.clientSecret("google-client-secret")
			.clientAuthenticationMethod(ClientAuthenticationMethod.CLIENT_SECRET_BASIC)
			.authorizationGrantType(AuthorizationGrantType.AUTHORIZATION_CODE)
			.redirectUri("{baseUrl}/login/oauth2/code/{registrationId}")
			.scope("openid", "profile", "email", "address", "phone")
			.authorizationUri("https://accounts.google.com/o/oauth2/v2/auth")
			.tokenUri("https://www.googleapis.com/oauth2/v4/token")
			.userInfoUri("https://www.googleapis.com/oauth2/v3/userinfo")
			.userNameAttributeName(IdTokenClaimNames.SUB)
			.jwkSetUri("https://www.googleapis.com/oauth2/v3/certs")
			.clientName("Google")
			.build();
	}
}
Kotlin
@Configuration
class OAuth2LoginConfig {
    @Bean
    fun clientRegistrationRepository(): ClientRegistrationRepository {
        return InMemoryClientRegistrationRepository(googleClientRegistration())
    }

    private fun googleClientRegistration(): ClientRegistration {
        return ClientRegistration.withRegistrationId("google")
                .clientId("google-client-id")
                .clientSecret("google-client-secret")
                .clientAuthenticationMethod(ClientAuthenticationMethod.CLIENT_SECRET_BASIC)
                .authorizationGrantType(AuthorizationGrantType.AUTHORIZATION_CODE)
                .redirectUri("{baseUrl}/login/oauth2/code/{registrationId}")
                .scope("openid", "profile", "email", "address", "phone")
                .authorizationUri("https://accounts.google.com/o/oauth2/v2/auth")
                .tokenUri("https://www.googleapis.com/oauth2/v4/token")
                .userInfoUri("https://www.googleapis.com/oauth2/v3/userinfo")
                .userNameAttributeName(IdTokenClaimNames.SUB)
                .jwkSetUri("https://www.googleapis.com/oauth2/v3/certs")
                .clientName("Google")
                .build()
    }
}

Register a SecurityFilterChain @Bean

The following example shows how to register a SecurityFilterChain @Bean with @EnableWebSecurity and enable OAuth 2.0 login through httpSecurity.oauth2Login():

Example 2. OAuth2 Login Configuration
Java
@EnableWebSecurity
public class OAuth2LoginSecurityConfig {

	@Bean
	public SecurityFilterChain filterChain(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
		http
			.authorizeHttpRequests(authorize -> authorize
				.anyRequest().authenticated()
			)
			.oauth2Login(withDefaults());
		return http.build();
	}
}
Kotlin
@EnableWebSecurity
class OAuth2LoginSecurityConfig {

    open fun filterChain(http: HttpSecurity): SecurityFilterChain {
        http {
            authorizeRequests {
                authorize(anyRequest, authenticated)
            }
            oauth2Login { }
        }
        return http.build()
    }
}

Completely Override the Auto-configuration

The following example shows how to completely override the auto-configuration by registering a ClientRegistrationRepository @Bean and a SecurityFilterChain @Bean.

Example 3. Overriding the auto-configuration
Java
@Configuration
public class OAuth2LoginConfig {

	@Bean
	public SecurityFilterChain filterChain(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
		http
			.authorizeHttpRequests(authorize -> authorize
				.anyRequest().authenticated()
			)
			.oauth2Login(withDefaults());
		return http.build();
	}

	@Bean
	public ClientRegistrationRepository clientRegistrationRepository() {
		return new InMemoryClientRegistrationRepository(this.googleClientRegistration());
	}

	private ClientRegistration googleClientRegistration() {
		return ClientRegistration.withRegistrationId("google")
			.clientId("google-client-id")
			.clientSecret("google-client-secret")
			.clientAuthenticationMethod(ClientAuthenticationMethod.CLIENT_SECRET_BASIC)
			.authorizationGrantType(AuthorizationGrantType.AUTHORIZATION_CODE)
			.redirectUri("{baseUrl}/login/oauth2/code/{registrationId}")
			.scope("openid", "profile", "email", "address", "phone")
			.authorizationUri("https://accounts.google.com/o/oauth2/v2/auth")
			.tokenUri("https://www.googleapis.com/oauth2/v4/token")
			.userInfoUri("https://www.googleapis.com/oauth2/v3/userinfo")
			.userNameAttributeName(IdTokenClaimNames.SUB)
			.jwkSetUri("https://www.googleapis.com/oauth2/v3/certs")
			.clientName("Google")
			.build();
	}
}
Kotlin
@Configuration
class OAuth2LoginConfig {

    @Bean
    open fun filterChain(http: HttpSecurity): SecurityFilterChain {
        http {
            authorizeRequests {
                authorize(anyRequest, authenticated)
            }
            oauth2Login { }
        }
        return http.build()
    }

    @Bean
    fun clientRegistrationRepository(): ClientRegistrationRepository {
        return InMemoryClientRegistrationRepository(googleClientRegistration())
    }

    private fun googleClientRegistration(): ClientRegistration {
        return ClientRegistration.withRegistrationId("google")
                .clientId("google-client-id")
                .clientSecret("google-client-secret")
                .clientAuthenticationMethod(ClientAuthenticationMethod.CLIENT_SECRET_BASIC)
                .authorizationGrantType(AuthorizationGrantType.AUTHORIZATION_CODE)
                .redirectUri("{baseUrl}/login/oauth2/code/{registrationId}")
                .scope("openid", "profile", "email", "address", "phone")
                .authorizationUri("https://accounts.google.com/o/oauth2/v2/auth")
                .tokenUri("https://www.googleapis.com/oauth2/v4/token")
                .userInfoUri("https://www.googleapis.com/oauth2/v3/userinfo")
                .userNameAttributeName(IdTokenClaimNames.SUB)
                .jwkSetUri("https://www.googleapis.com/oauth2/v3/certs")
                .clientName("Google")
                .build()
    }
}

Java Configuration without Spring Boot 2.x

If you are not able to use Spring Boot 2.x and would like to configure one of the pre-defined providers in CommonOAuth2Provider (for example, Google), apply the following configuration:

Example 4. OAuth2 Login Configuration
Java
@EnableWebSecurity
public class OAuth2LoginConfig {

	@Bean
	public SecurityFilterChain filterChain(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
		http
			.authorizeHttpRequests(authorize -> authorize
				.anyRequest().authenticated()
			)
			.oauth2Login(withDefaults());
		return http.build();
	}

	@Bean
	public ClientRegistrationRepository clientRegistrationRepository() {
		return new InMemoryClientRegistrationRepository(this.googleClientRegistration());
	}

	@Bean
	public OAuth2AuthorizedClientService authorizedClientService(
			ClientRegistrationRepository clientRegistrationRepository) {
		return new InMemoryOAuth2AuthorizedClientService(clientRegistrationRepository);
	}

	@Bean
	public OAuth2AuthorizedClientRepository authorizedClientRepository(
			OAuth2AuthorizedClientService authorizedClientService) {
		return new AuthenticatedPrincipalOAuth2AuthorizedClientRepository(authorizedClientService);
	}

	private ClientRegistration googleClientRegistration() {
		return CommonOAuth2Provider.GOOGLE.getBuilder("google")
			.clientId("google-client-id")
			.clientSecret("google-client-secret")
			.build();
	}
}
Kotlin
@EnableWebSecurity
open class OAuth2LoginConfig {
    @Bean
    open fun filterChain(http: HttpSecurity): SecurityFilterChain {
        http {
            authorizeRequests {
                authorize(anyRequest, authenticated)
            }
            oauth2Login { }
        }
        return http.build()
    }

    @Bean
    open fun clientRegistrationRepository(): ClientRegistrationRepository {
        return InMemoryClientRegistrationRepository(googleClientRegistration())
    }

    @Bean
    open fun authorizedClientService(
        clientRegistrationRepository: ClientRegistrationRepository?
    ): OAuth2AuthorizedClientService {
        return InMemoryOAuth2AuthorizedClientService(clientRegistrationRepository)
    }

    @Bean
    open fun authorizedClientRepository(
        authorizedClientService: OAuth2AuthorizedClientService?
    ): OAuth2AuthorizedClientRepository {
        return AuthenticatedPrincipalOAuth2AuthorizedClientRepository(authorizedClientService)
    }

    private fun googleClientRegistration(): ClientRegistration {
        return CommonOAuth2Provider.GOOGLE.getBuilder("google")
            .clientId("google-client-id")
            .clientSecret("google-client-secret")
            .build()
    }
}
Xml
<http auto-config="true">
	<intercept-url pattern="/**" access="authenticated"/>
	<oauth2-login authorized-client-repository-ref="authorizedClientRepository"/>
</http>

<client-registrations>
	<client-registration registration-id="google"
						 client-id="google-client-id"
						 client-secret="google-client-secret"
						 provider-id="google"/>
</client-registrations>

<b:bean id="authorizedClientService"
		class="org.springframework.security.oauth2.client.InMemoryOAuth2AuthorizedClientService"
		autowire="constructor"/>

<b:bean id="authorizedClientRepository"
		class="org.springframework.security.oauth2.client.web.AuthenticatedPrincipalOAuth2AuthorizedClientRepository">
	<b:constructor-arg ref="authorizedClientService"/>
</b:bean>