For the latest stable version, please use Spring Security 5.7.3!

Authorization Grant Support

Authorization Code

Please refer to the OAuth 2.0 Authorization Framework for further details on the Authorization Code grant.

Obtaining Authorization

Please refer to the Authorization Request/Response protocol flow for the Authorization Code grant.

Initiating the Authorization Request

The OAuth2AuthorizationRequestRedirectFilter uses an OAuth2AuthorizationRequestResolver to resolve an OAuth2AuthorizationRequest and initiate the Authorization Code grant flow by redirecting the end-user’s user-agent to the Authorization Server’s Authorization Endpoint.

The primary role of the OAuth2AuthorizationRequestResolver is to resolve an OAuth2AuthorizationRequest from the provided web request. The default implementation DefaultOAuth2AuthorizationRequestResolver matches on the (default) path /oauth2/authorization/{registrationId} extracting the registrationId and using it to build the OAuth2AuthorizationRequest for the associated ClientRegistration.

Given the following Spring Boot 2.x properties for an OAuth 2.0 Client registration:

spring:
  security:
    oauth2:
      client:
        registration:
          okta:
            client-id: okta-client-id
            client-secret: okta-client-secret
            authorization-grant-type: authorization_code
            redirect-uri: "{baseUrl}/authorized/okta"
            scope: read, write
        provider:
          okta:
            authorization-uri: https://dev-1234.oktapreview.com/oauth2/v1/authorize
            token-uri: https://dev-1234.oktapreview.com/oauth2/v1/token

A request with the base path /oauth2/authorization/okta will initiate the Authorization Request redirect by the OAuth2AuthorizationRequestRedirectFilter and ultimately start the Authorization Code grant flow.

The AuthorizationCodeOAuth2AuthorizedClientProvider is an implementation of OAuth2AuthorizedClientProvider for the Authorization Code grant, which also initiates the Authorization Request redirect by the OAuth2AuthorizationRequestRedirectFilter.

If the OAuth 2.0 Client is a Public Client, then configure the OAuth 2.0 Client registration as follows:

spring:
  security:
    oauth2:
      client:
        registration:
          okta:
            client-id: okta-client-id
            client-authentication-method: none
            authorization-grant-type: authorization_code
            redirect-uri: "{baseUrl}/authorized/okta"
            ...

Public Clients are supported using Proof Key for Code Exchange (PKCE). If the client is running in an untrusted environment (eg. native application or web browser-based application) and therefore incapable of maintaining the confidentiality of it’s credentials, PKCE will automatically be used when the following conditions are true:

  1. client-secret is omitted (or empty)

  2. client-authentication-method is set to "none" (ClientAuthenticationMethod.NONE)

If the OAuth 2.0 Provider supports PKCE for Confidential Clients, you may (optionally) configure it using DefaultOAuth2AuthorizationRequestResolver.setAuthorizationRequestCustomizer(OAuth2AuthorizationRequestCustomizers.withPkce()).

The DefaultOAuth2AuthorizationRequestResolver also supports URI template variables for the redirect-uri using UriComponentsBuilder.

The following configuration uses all the supported URI template variables:

spring:
  security:
    oauth2:
      client:
        registration:
          okta:
            ...
            redirect-uri: "{baseScheme}://{baseHost}{basePort}{basePath}/authorized/{registrationId}"
            ...
{baseUrl} resolves to {baseScheme}://{baseHost}{basePort}{basePath}

Configuring the redirect-uri with URI template variables is especially useful when the OAuth 2.0 Client is running behind a Proxy Server. This ensures that the X-Forwarded-* headers are used when expanding the redirect-uri.

Customizing the Authorization Request

One of the primary use cases an OAuth2AuthorizationRequestResolver can realize is the ability to customize the Authorization Request with additional parameters above the standard parameters defined in the OAuth 2.0 Authorization Framework.

For example, OpenID Connect defines additional OAuth 2.0 request parameters for the Authorization Code Flow extending from the standard parameters defined in the OAuth 2.0 Authorization Framework. One of those extended parameters is the prompt parameter.

OPTIONAL. Space delimited, case sensitive list of ASCII string values that specifies whether the Authorization Server prompts the End-User for reauthentication and consent. The defined values are: none, login, consent, select_account

The following example shows how to configure the DefaultOAuth2AuthorizationRequestResolver with a Consumer<OAuth2AuthorizationRequest.Builder> that customizes the Authorization Request for oauth2Login(), by including the request parameter prompt=consent.

Java
@EnableWebSecurity
public class OAuth2LoginSecurityConfig {

	@Autowired
	private ClientRegistrationRepository clientRegistrationRepository;

	@Bean
	public SecurityFilterChain filterChain(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
		http
			.authorizeHttpRequests(authorize -> authorize
				.anyRequest().authenticated()
			)
			.oauth2Login(oauth2 -> oauth2
				.authorizationEndpoint(authorization -> authorization
					.authorizationRequestResolver(
						authorizationRequestResolver(this.clientRegistrationRepository)
					)
				)
			);
		return http.build();
	}

	private OAuth2AuthorizationRequestResolver authorizationRequestResolver(
			ClientRegistrationRepository clientRegistrationRepository) {

		DefaultOAuth2AuthorizationRequestResolver authorizationRequestResolver =
				new DefaultOAuth2AuthorizationRequestResolver(
						clientRegistrationRepository, "/oauth2/authorization");
		authorizationRequestResolver.setAuthorizationRequestCustomizer(
				authorizationRequestCustomizer());

		return  authorizationRequestResolver;
	}

	private Consumer<OAuth2AuthorizationRequest.Builder> authorizationRequestCustomizer() {
		return customizer -> customizer
					.additionalParameters(params -> params.put("prompt", "consent"));
	}
}
Kotlin
@EnableWebSecurity
class SecurityConfig {

    @Autowired
    private lateinit var customClientRegistrationRepository: ClientRegistrationRepository

    @Bean
    open fun filterChain(http: HttpSecurity): SecurityFilterChain {
        http {
            authorizeRequests {
                authorize(anyRequest, authenticated)
            }
            oauth2Login {
                authorizationEndpoint {
                    authorizationRequestResolver = authorizationRequestResolver(customClientRegistrationRepository)
                }
            }
        }
        return http.build()
    }

    private fun authorizationRequestResolver(
            clientRegistrationRepository: ClientRegistrationRepository?): OAuth2AuthorizationRequestResolver? {
        val authorizationRequestResolver = DefaultOAuth2AuthorizationRequestResolver(
                clientRegistrationRepository, "/oauth2/authorization")
        authorizationRequestResolver.setAuthorizationRequestCustomizer(
                authorizationRequestCustomizer())
        return authorizationRequestResolver
    }

    private fun authorizationRequestCustomizer(): Consumer<OAuth2AuthorizationRequest.Builder> {
        return Consumer { customizer ->
            customizer
                    .additionalParameters { params -> params["prompt"] = "consent" }
        }
    }
}

For the simple use case, where the additional request parameter is always the same for a specific provider, it may be added directly in the authorization-uri property.

For example, if the value for the request parameter prompt is always consent for the provider okta, than simply configure as follows:

spring:
  security:
    oauth2:
      client:
        provider:
          okta:
            authorization-uri: https://dev-1234.oktapreview.com/oauth2/v1/authorize?prompt=consent

The preceding example shows the common use case of adding a custom parameter on top of the standard parameters. Alternatively, if your requirements are more advanced, you can take full control in building the Authorization Request URI by simply overriding the OAuth2AuthorizationRequest.authorizationRequestUri property.

OAuth2AuthorizationRequest.Builder.build() constructs the OAuth2AuthorizationRequest.authorizationRequestUri, which represents the Authorization Request URI including all query parameters using the application/x-www-form-urlencoded format.

The following example shows a variation of authorizationRequestCustomizer() from the preceding example, and instead overrides the OAuth2AuthorizationRequest.authorizationRequestUri property.

Java
private Consumer<OAuth2AuthorizationRequest.Builder> authorizationRequestCustomizer() {
	return customizer -> customizer
				.authorizationRequestUri(uriBuilder -> uriBuilder
					.queryParam("prompt", "consent").build());
}
Kotlin
private fun authorizationRequestCustomizer(): Consumer<OAuth2AuthorizationRequest.Builder> {
    return Consumer { customizer: OAuth2AuthorizationRequest.Builder ->
        customizer
                .authorizationRequestUri { uriBuilder: UriBuilder ->
                    uriBuilder
                            .queryParam("prompt", "consent").build()
                }
    }
}

Storing the Authorization Request

The AuthorizationRequestRepository is responsible for the persistence of the OAuth2AuthorizationRequest from the time the Authorization Request is initiated to the time the Authorization Response is received (the callback).

The OAuth2AuthorizationRequest is used to correlate and validate the Authorization Response.

The default implementation of AuthorizationRequestRepository is HttpSessionOAuth2AuthorizationRequestRepository, which stores the OAuth2AuthorizationRequest in the HttpSession.

If you have a custom implementation of AuthorizationRequestRepository, you may configure it as shown in the following example:

Example 1. AuthorizationRequestRepository Configuration
Java
@EnableWebSecurity
public class OAuth2ClientSecurityConfig {

	@Bean
	public SecurityFilterChain filterChain(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
		http
			.oauth2Client(oauth2 -> oauth2
				.authorizationCodeGrant(codeGrant -> codeGrant
					.authorizationRequestRepository(this.authorizationRequestRepository())
					...
				)
			);
		return http.build();
	}
}
Kotlin
@EnableWebSecurity
class OAuth2ClientSecurityConfig {

    @Bean
    open fun filterChain(http: HttpSecurity): SecurityFilterChain {
        http {
            oauth2Client {
                authorizationCodeGrant {
                    authorizationRequestRepository = authorizationRequestRepository()
                }
            }
        }
        return http.build()
    }
}
Xml
<http>
	<oauth2-client>
		<authorization-code-grant authorization-request-repository-ref="authorizationRequestRepository"/>
	</oauth2-client>
</http>

Requesting an Access Token

Please refer to the Access Token Request/Response protocol flow for the Authorization Code grant.

The default implementation of OAuth2AccessTokenResponseClient for the Authorization Code grant is DefaultAuthorizationCodeTokenResponseClient, which uses a RestOperations for exchanging an authorization code for an access token at the Authorization Server’s Token Endpoint.

The DefaultAuthorizationCodeTokenResponseClient is quite flexible as it allows you to customize the pre-processing of the Token Request and/or post-handling of the Token Response.

Customizing the Access Token Request

If you need to customize the pre-processing of the Token Request, you can provide DefaultAuthorizationCodeTokenResponseClient.setRequestEntityConverter() with a custom Converter<OAuth2AuthorizationCodeGrantRequest, RequestEntity<?>>. The default implementation OAuth2AuthorizationCodeGrantRequestEntityConverter builds a RequestEntity representation of a standard OAuth 2.0 Access Token Request. However, providing a custom Converter, would allow you to extend the standard Token Request and add custom parameter(s).

To customize only the parameters of the request, you can provide OAuth2AuthorizationCodeGrantRequestEntityConverter.setParametersConverter() with a custom Converter<OAuth2AuthorizationCodeGrantRequest, MultiValueMap<String, String>> to completely override the parameters sent with the request. This is often simpler than constructing a RequestEntity directly.

If you prefer to only add additional parameters, you can provide OAuth2AuthorizationCodeGrantRequestEntityConverter.addParametersConverter() with a custom Converter<OAuth2AuthorizationCodeGrantRequest, MultiValueMap<String, String>> which constructs an aggregate Converter.
The custom Converter must return a valid RequestEntity representation of an OAuth 2.0 Access Token Request that is understood by the intended OAuth 2.0 Provider.

Customizing the Access Token Response

On the other end, if you need to customize the post-handling of the Token Response, you will need to provide DefaultAuthorizationCodeTokenResponseClient.setRestOperations() with a custom configured RestOperations. The default RestOperations is configured as follows:

Java
RestTemplate restTemplate = new RestTemplate(Arrays.asList(
		new FormHttpMessageConverter(),
		new OAuth2AccessTokenResponseHttpMessageConverter()));

restTemplate.setErrorHandler(new OAuth2ErrorResponseErrorHandler());
Kotlin
val restTemplate = RestTemplate(listOf(
        FormHttpMessageConverter(),
        OAuth2AccessTokenResponseHttpMessageConverter()))

restTemplate.errorHandler = OAuth2ErrorResponseErrorHandler()
Spring MVC FormHttpMessageConverter is required as it’s used when sending the OAuth 2.0 Access Token Request.

OAuth2AccessTokenResponseHttpMessageConverter is a HttpMessageConverter for an OAuth 2.0 Access Token Response. You can provide OAuth2AccessTokenResponseHttpMessageConverter.setAccessTokenResponseConverter() with a custom Converter<Map<String, Object>, OAuth2AccessTokenResponse> that is used for converting the OAuth 2.0 Access Token Response parameters to an OAuth2AccessTokenResponse.

OAuth2ErrorResponseErrorHandler is a ResponseErrorHandler that can handle an OAuth 2.0 Error, eg. 400 Bad Request. It uses an OAuth2ErrorHttpMessageConverter for converting the OAuth 2.0 Error parameters to an OAuth2Error.

Whether you customize DefaultAuthorizationCodeTokenResponseClient or provide your own implementation of OAuth2AccessTokenResponseClient, you’ll need to configure it as shown in the following example:

Example 2. Access Token Response Configuration
Java
@EnableWebSecurity
public class OAuth2ClientSecurityConfig {

	@Bean
	public SecurityFilterChain filterChain(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
		http
			.oauth2Client(oauth2 -> oauth2
				.authorizationCodeGrant(codeGrant -> codeGrant
					.accessTokenResponseClient(this.accessTokenResponseClient())
					...
				)
			);
		return http.build();
	}
}
Kotlin
@EnableWebSecurity
class OAuth2ClientSecurityConfig {

    @Bean
    open fun filterChain(http: HttpSecurity): SecurityFilterChain {
        http {
            oauth2Client {
                authorizationCodeGrant {
                    accessTokenResponseClient = accessTokenResponseClient()
                }
            }
        }
        return http.build()
    }
}
Xml
<http>
	<oauth2-client>
		<authorization-code-grant access-token-response-client-ref="accessTokenResponseClient"/>
	</oauth2-client>
</http>

Refresh Token

Please refer to the OAuth 2.0 Authorization Framework for further details on the Refresh Token.

Refreshing an Access Token

Please refer to the Access Token Request/Response protocol flow for the Refresh Token grant.

The default implementation of OAuth2AccessTokenResponseClient for the Refresh Token grant is DefaultRefreshTokenTokenResponseClient, which uses a RestOperations when refreshing an access token at the Authorization Server’s Token Endpoint.

The DefaultRefreshTokenTokenResponseClient is quite flexible as it allows you to customize the pre-processing of the Token Request and/or post-handling of the Token Response.

Customizing the Access Token Request

If you need to customize the pre-processing of the Token Request, you can provide DefaultRefreshTokenTokenResponseClient.setRequestEntityConverter() with a custom Converter<OAuth2RefreshTokenGrantRequest, RequestEntity<?>>. The default implementation OAuth2RefreshTokenGrantRequestEntityConverter builds a RequestEntity representation of a standard OAuth 2.0 Access Token Request. However, providing a custom Converter, would allow you to extend the standard Token Request and add custom parameter(s).

To customize only the parameters of the request, you can provide OAuth2RefreshTokenGrantRequestEntityConverter.setParametersConverter() with a custom Converter<OAuth2RefreshTokenGrantRequest, MultiValueMap<String, String>> to completely override the parameters sent with the request. This is often simpler than constructing a RequestEntity directly.

If you prefer to only add additional parameters, you can provide OAuth2RefreshTokenGrantRequestEntityConverter.addParametersConverter() with a custom Converter<OAuth2RefreshTokenGrantRequest, MultiValueMap<String, String>> which constructs an aggregate Converter.
The custom Converter must return a valid RequestEntity representation of an OAuth 2.0 Access Token Request that is understood by the intended OAuth 2.0 Provider.

Customizing the Access Token Response

On the other end, if you need to customize the post-handling of the Token Response, you will need to provide DefaultRefreshTokenTokenResponseClient.setRestOperations() with a custom configured RestOperations. The default RestOperations is configured as follows:

Java
RestTemplate restTemplate = new RestTemplate(Arrays.asList(
		new FormHttpMessageConverter(),
		new OAuth2AccessTokenResponseHttpMessageConverter()));

restTemplate.setErrorHandler(new OAuth2ErrorResponseErrorHandler());
Kotlin
val restTemplate = RestTemplate(listOf(
        FormHttpMessageConverter(),
        OAuth2AccessTokenResponseHttpMessageConverter()))

restTemplate.errorHandler = OAuth2ErrorResponseErrorHandler()
Spring MVC FormHttpMessageConverter is required as it’s used when sending the OAuth 2.0 Access Token Request.

OAuth2AccessTokenResponseHttpMessageConverter is a HttpMessageConverter for an OAuth 2.0 Access Token Response. You can provide OAuth2AccessTokenResponseHttpMessageConverter.setAccessTokenResponseConverter() with a custom Converter<Map<String, Object>, OAuth2AccessTokenResponse> that is used for converting the OAuth 2.0 Access Token Response parameters to an OAuth2AccessTokenResponse.

OAuth2ErrorResponseErrorHandler is a ResponseErrorHandler that can handle an OAuth 2.0 Error, eg. 400 Bad Request. It uses an OAuth2ErrorHttpMessageConverter for converting the OAuth 2.0 Error parameters to an OAuth2Error.

Whether you customize DefaultRefreshTokenTokenResponseClient or provide your own implementation of OAuth2AccessTokenResponseClient, you’ll need to configure it as shown in the following example:

Java
// Customize
OAuth2AccessTokenResponseClient<OAuth2RefreshTokenGrantRequest> refreshTokenTokenResponseClient = ...

OAuth2AuthorizedClientProvider authorizedClientProvider =
		OAuth2AuthorizedClientProviderBuilder.builder()
				.authorizationCode()
				.refreshToken(configurer -> configurer.accessTokenResponseClient(refreshTokenTokenResponseClient))
				.build();

...

authorizedClientManager.setAuthorizedClientProvider(authorizedClientProvider);
Kotlin
// Customize
val refreshTokenTokenResponseClient: OAuth2AccessTokenResponseClient<OAuth2RefreshTokenGrantRequest> = ...

val authorizedClientProvider = OAuth2AuthorizedClientProviderBuilder.builder()
        .authorizationCode()
        .refreshToken { it.accessTokenResponseClient(refreshTokenTokenResponseClient) }
        .build()

...

authorizedClientManager.setAuthorizedClientProvider(authorizedClientProvider)
OAuth2AuthorizedClientProviderBuilder.builder().refreshToken() configures a RefreshTokenOAuth2AuthorizedClientProvider, which is an implementation of an OAuth2AuthorizedClientProvider for the Refresh Token grant.

The OAuth2RefreshToken may optionally be returned in the Access Token Response for the authorization_code and password grant types. If the OAuth2AuthorizedClient.getRefreshToken() is available and the OAuth2AuthorizedClient.getAccessToken() is expired, it will automatically be refreshed by the RefreshTokenOAuth2AuthorizedClientProvider.

Client Credentials

Please refer to the OAuth 2.0 Authorization Framework for further details on the Client Credentials grant.

Requesting an Access Token

Please refer to the Access Token Request/Response protocol flow for the Client Credentials grant.

The default implementation of OAuth2AccessTokenResponseClient for the Client Credentials grant is DefaultClientCredentialsTokenResponseClient, which uses a RestOperations when requesting an access token at the Authorization Server’s Token Endpoint.

The DefaultClientCredentialsTokenResponseClient is quite flexible as it allows you to customize the pre-processing of the Token Request and/or post-handling of the Token Response.

Customizing the Access Token Request

If you need to customize the pre-processing of the Token Request, you can provide DefaultClientCredentialsTokenResponseClient.setRequestEntityConverter() with a custom Converter<OAuth2ClientCredentialsGrantRequest, RequestEntity<?>>. The default implementation OAuth2ClientCredentialsGrantRequestEntityConverter builds a RequestEntity representation of a standard OAuth 2.0 Access Token Request. However, providing a custom Converter, would allow you to extend the standard Token Request and add custom parameter(s).

To customize only the parameters of the request, you can provide OAuth2ClientCredentialsGrantRequestEntityConverter.setParametersConverter() with a custom Converter<OAuth2ClientCredentialsGrantRequest, MultiValueMap<String, String>> to completely override the parameters sent with the request. This is often simpler than constructing a RequestEntity directly.

If you prefer to only add additional parameters, you can provide OAuth2ClientCredentialsGrantRequestEntityConverter.addParametersConverter() with a custom Converter<OAuth2ClientCredentialsGrantRequest, MultiValueMap<String, String>> which constructs an aggregate Converter.
The custom Converter must return a valid RequestEntity representation of an OAuth 2.0 Access Token Request that is understood by the intended OAuth 2.0 Provider.

Customizing the Access Token Response

On the other end, if you need to customize the post-handling of the Token Response, you will need to provide DefaultClientCredentialsTokenResponseClient.setRestOperations() with a custom configured RestOperations. The default RestOperations is configured as follows:

Java
RestTemplate restTemplate = new RestTemplate(Arrays.asList(
		new FormHttpMessageConverter(),
		new OAuth2AccessTokenResponseHttpMessageConverter()));

restTemplate.setErrorHandler(new OAuth2ErrorResponseErrorHandler());
Kotlin
val restTemplate = RestTemplate(listOf(
        FormHttpMessageConverter(),
        OAuth2AccessTokenResponseHttpMessageConverter()))

restTemplate.errorHandler = OAuth2ErrorResponseErrorHandler()
Spring MVC FormHttpMessageConverter is required as it’s used when sending the OAuth 2.0 Access Token Request.

OAuth2AccessTokenResponseHttpMessageConverter is a HttpMessageConverter for an OAuth 2.0 Access Token Response. You can provide OAuth2AccessTokenResponseHttpMessageConverter.setAccessTokenResponseConverter() with a custom Converter<Map<String, Object>, OAuth2AccessTokenResponse> that is used for converting the OAuth 2.0 Access Token Response parameters to an OAuth2AccessTokenResponse.

OAuth2ErrorResponseErrorHandler is a ResponseErrorHandler that can handle an OAuth 2.0 Error, eg. 400 Bad Request. It uses an OAuth2ErrorHttpMessageConverter for converting the OAuth 2.0 Error parameters to an OAuth2Error.

Whether you customize DefaultClientCredentialsTokenResponseClient or provide your own implementation of OAuth2AccessTokenResponseClient, you’ll need to configure it as shown in the following example:

Java
// Customize
OAuth2AccessTokenResponseClient<OAuth2ClientCredentialsGrantRequest> clientCredentialsTokenResponseClient = ...

OAuth2AuthorizedClientProvider authorizedClientProvider =
		OAuth2AuthorizedClientProviderBuilder.builder()
				.clientCredentials(configurer -> configurer.accessTokenResponseClient(clientCredentialsTokenResponseClient))
				.build();

...

authorizedClientManager.setAuthorizedClientProvider(authorizedClientProvider);
Kotlin
// Customize
val clientCredentialsTokenResponseClient: OAuth2AccessTokenResponseClient<OAuth2ClientCredentialsGrantRequest> = ...

val authorizedClientProvider = OAuth2AuthorizedClientProviderBuilder.builder()
        .clientCredentials { it.accessTokenResponseClient(clientCredentialsTokenResponseClient) }
        .build()

...

authorizedClientManager.setAuthorizedClientProvider(authorizedClientProvider)
OAuth2AuthorizedClientProviderBuilder.builder().clientCredentials() configures a ClientCredentialsOAuth2AuthorizedClientProvider, which is an implementation of an OAuth2AuthorizedClientProvider for the Client Credentials grant.

Using the Access Token

Given the following Spring Boot 2.x properties for an OAuth 2.0 Client registration:

spring:
  security:
    oauth2:
      client:
        registration:
          okta:
            client-id: okta-client-id
            client-secret: okta-client-secret
            authorization-grant-type: client_credentials
            scope: read, write
        provider:
          okta:
            token-uri: https://dev-1234.oktapreview.com/oauth2/v1/token

…​and the OAuth2AuthorizedClientManager @Bean:

Java
@Bean
public OAuth2AuthorizedClientManager authorizedClientManager(
		ClientRegistrationRepository clientRegistrationRepository,
		OAuth2AuthorizedClientRepository authorizedClientRepository) {

	OAuth2AuthorizedClientProvider authorizedClientProvider =
			OAuth2AuthorizedClientProviderBuilder.builder()
					.clientCredentials()
					.build();

	DefaultOAuth2AuthorizedClientManager authorizedClientManager =
			new DefaultOAuth2AuthorizedClientManager(
					clientRegistrationRepository, authorizedClientRepository);
	authorizedClientManager.setAuthorizedClientProvider(authorizedClientProvider);

	return authorizedClientManager;
}
Kotlin
@Bean
fun authorizedClientManager(
        clientRegistrationRepository: ClientRegistrationRepository,
        authorizedClientRepository: OAuth2AuthorizedClientRepository): OAuth2AuthorizedClientManager {
    val authorizedClientProvider = OAuth2AuthorizedClientProviderBuilder.builder()
            .clientCredentials()
            .build()
    val authorizedClientManager = DefaultOAuth2AuthorizedClientManager(
            clientRegistrationRepository, authorizedClientRepository)
    authorizedClientManager.setAuthorizedClientProvider(authorizedClientProvider)
    return authorizedClientManager
}

You may obtain the OAuth2AccessToken as follows:

Java
@Controller
public class OAuth2ClientController {

	@Autowired
	private OAuth2AuthorizedClientManager authorizedClientManager;

	@GetMapping("/")
	public String index(Authentication authentication,
						HttpServletRequest servletRequest,
						HttpServletResponse servletResponse) {

		OAuth2AuthorizeRequest authorizeRequest = OAuth2AuthorizeRequest.withClientRegistrationId("okta")
				.principal(authentication)
				.attributes(attrs -> {
					attrs.put(HttpServletRequest.class.getName(), servletRequest);
					attrs.put(HttpServletResponse.class.getName(), servletResponse);
				})
				.build();
		OAuth2AuthorizedClient authorizedClient = this.authorizedClientManager.authorize(authorizeRequest);

		OAuth2AccessToken accessToken = authorizedClient.getAccessToken();

		...

		return "index";
	}
}
Kotlin
class OAuth2ClientController {

    @Autowired
    private lateinit var authorizedClientManager: OAuth2AuthorizedClientManager

    @GetMapping("/")
    fun index(authentication: Authentication?,
              servletRequest: HttpServletRequest,
              servletResponse: HttpServletResponse): String {
        val authorizeRequest: OAuth2AuthorizeRequest = OAuth2AuthorizeRequest.withClientRegistrationId("okta")
                .principal(authentication)
                .attributes(Consumer { attrs: MutableMap<String, Any> ->
                    attrs[HttpServletRequest::class.java.name] = servletRequest
                    attrs[HttpServletResponse::class.java.name] = servletResponse
                })
                .build()
        val authorizedClient = authorizedClientManager.authorize(authorizeRequest)
        val accessToken: OAuth2AccessToken = authorizedClient.accessToken

        ...

        return "index"
    }
}
HttpServletRequest and HttpServletResponse are both OPTIONAL attributes. If not provided, it will default to ServletRequestAttributes using RequestContextHolder.getRequestAttributes().

Resource Owner Password Credentials

Please refer to the OAuth 2.0 Authorization Framework for further details on the Resource Owner Password Credentials grant.

Requesting an Access Token

Please refer to the Access Token Request/Response protocol flow for the Resource Owner Password Credentials grant.

The default implementation of OAuth2AccessTokenResponseClient for the Resource Owner Password Credentials grant is DefaultPasswordTokenResponseClient, which uses a RestOperations when requesting an access token at the Authorization Server’s Token Endpoint.

The DefaultPasswordTokenResponseClient is quite flexible as it allows you to customize the pre-processing of the Token Request and/or post-handling of the Token Response.

Customizing the Access Token Request

If you need to customize the pre-processing of the Token Request, you can provide DefaultPasswordTokenResponseClient.setRequestEntityConverter() with a custom Converter<OAuth2PasswordGrantRequest, RequestEntity<?>>. The default implementation OAuth2PasswordGrantRequestEntityConverter builds a RequestEntity representation of a standard OAuth 2.0 Access Token Request. However, providing a custom Converter, would allow you to extend the standard Token Request and add custom parameter(s).

To customize only the parameters of the request, you can provide OAuth2PasswordGrantRequestEntityConverter.setParametersConverter() with a custom Converter<OAuth2PasswordGrantRequest, MultiValueMap<String, String>> to completely override the parameters sent with the request. This is often simpler than constructing a RequestEntity directly.

If you prefer to only add additional parameters, you can provide OAuth2PasswordGrantRequestEntityConverter.addParametersConverter() with a custom Converter<OAuth2PasswordGrantRequest, MultiValueMap<String, String>> which constructs an aggregate Converter.
The custom Converter must return a valid RequestEntity representation of an OAuth 2.0 Access Token Request that is understood by the intended OAuth 2.0 Provider.

Customizing the Access Token Response

On the other end, if you need to customize the post-handling of the Token Response, you will need to provide DefaultPasswordTokenResponseClient.setRestOperations() with a custom configured RestOperations. The default RestOperations is configured as follows:

Java
RestTemplate restTemplate = new RestTemplate(Arrays.asList(
		new FormHttpMessageConverter(),
		new OAuth2AccessTokenResponseHttpMessageConverter()));

restTemplate.setErrorHandler(new OAuth2ErrorResponseErrorHandler());
Kotlin
val restTemplate = RestTemplate(listOf(
        FormHttpMessageConverter(),
        OAuth2AccessTokenResponseHttpMessageConverter()))

restTemplate.errorHandler = OAuth2ErrorResponseErrorHandler()
Spring MVC FormHttpMessageConverter is required as it’s used when sending the OAuth 2.0 Access Token Request.

OAuth2AccessTokenResponseHttpMessageConverter is a HttpMessageConverter for an OAuth 2.0 Access Token Response. You can provide OAuth2AccessTokenResponseHttpMessageConverter.setAccessTokenResponseConverter() with a custom Converter<Map<String, Object>, OAuth2AccessTokenResponse> that is used for converting the OAuth 2.0 Access Token Response parameters to an OAuth2AccessTokenResponse.

OAuth2ErrorResponseErrorHandler is a ResponseErrorHandler that can handle an OAuth 2.0 Error, eg. 400 Bad Request. It uses an OAuth2ErrorHttpMessageConverter for converting the OAuth 2.0 Error parameters to an OAuth2Error.

Whether you customize DefaultPasswordTokenResponseClient or provide your own implementation of OAuth2AccessTokenResponseClient, you’ll need to configure it as shown in the following example:

Java
// Customize
OAuth2AccessTokenResponseClient<OAuth2PasswordGrantRequest> passwordTokenResponseClient = ...

OAuth2AuthorizedClientProvider authorizedClientProvider =
		OAuth2AuthorizedClientProviderBuilder.builder()
				.password(configurer -> configurer.accessTokenResponseClient(passwordTokenResponseClient))
				.refreshToken()
				.build();

...

authorizedClientManager.setAuthorizedClientProvider(authorizedClientProvider);
Kotlin
val passwordTokenResponseClient: OAuth2AccessTokenResponseClient<OAuth2PasswordGrantRequest> = ...

val authorizedClientProvider = OAuth2AuthorizedClientProviderBuilder.builder()
        .password { it.accessTokenResponseClient(passwordTokenResponseClient) }
        .refreshToken()
        .build()

...

authorizedClientManager.setAuthorizedClientProvider(authorizedClientProvider)
OAuth2AuthorizedClientProviderBuilder.builder().password() configures a PasswordOAuth2AuthorizedClientProvider, which is an implementation of an OAuth2AuthorizedClientProvider for the Resource Owner Password Credentials grant.

Using the Access Token

Given the following Spring Boot 2.x properties for an OAuth 2.0 Client registration:

spring:
  security:
    oauth2:
      client:
        registration:
          okta:
            client-id: okta-client-id
            client-secret: okta-client-secret
            authorization-grant-type: password
            scope: read, write
        provider:
          okta:
            token-uri: https://dev-1234.oktapreview.com/oauth2/v1/token

…​and the OAuth2AuthorizedClientManager @Bean:

Java
@Bean
public OAuth2AuthorizedClientManager authorizedClientManager(
		ClientRegistrationRepository clientRegistrationRepository,
		OAuth2AuthorizedClientRepository authorizedClientRepository) {

	OAuth2AuthorizedClientProvider authorizedClientProvider =
			OAuth2AuthorizedClientProviderBuilder.builder()
					.password()
					.refreshToken()
					.build();

	DefaultOAuth2AuthorizedClientManager authorizedClientManager =
			new DefaultOAuth2AuthorizedClientManager(
					clientRegistrationRepository, authorizedClientRepository);
	authorizedClientManager.setAuthorizedClientProvider(authorizedClientProvider);

	// Assuming the `username` and `password` are supplied as `HttpServletRequest` parameters,
	// map the `HttpServletRequest` parameters to `OAuth2AuthorizationContext.getAttributes()`
	authorizedClientManager.setContextAttributesMapper(contextAttributesMapper());

	return authorizedClientManager;
}

private Function<OAuth2AuthorizeRequest, Map<String, Object>> contextAttributesMapper() {
	return authorizeRequest -> {
		Map<String, Object> contextAttributes = Collections.emptyMap();
		HttpServletRequest servletRequest = authorizeRequest.getAttribute(HttpServletRequest.class.getName());
		String username = servletRequest.getParameter(OAuth2ParameterNames.USERNAME);
		String password = servletRequest.getParameter(OAuth2ParameterNames.PASSWORD);
		if (StringUtils.hasText(username) && StringUtils.hasText(password)) {
			contextAttributes = new HashMap<>();

			// `PasswordOAuth2AuthorizedClientProvider` requires both attributes
			contextAttributes.put(OAuth2AuthorizationContext.USERNAME_ATTRIBUTE_NAME, username);
			contextAttributes.put(OAuth2AuthorizationContext.PASSWORD_ATTRIBUTE_NAME, password);
		}
		return contextAttributes;
	};
}
Kotlin
@Bean
fun authorizedClientManager(
        clientRegistrationRepository: ClientRegistrationRepository,
        authorizedClientRepository: OAuth2AuthorizedClientRepository): OAuth2AuthorizedClientManager {
    val authorizedClientProvider = OAuth2AuthorizedClientProviderBuilder.builder()
            .password()
            .refreshToken()
            .build()
    val authorizedClientManager = DefaultOAuth2AuthorizedClientManager(
            clientRegistrationRepository, authorizedClientRepository)
    authorizedClientManager.setAuthorizedClientProvider(authorizedClientProvider)

    // Assuming the `username` and `password` are supplied as `HttpServletRequest` parameters,
    // map the `HttpServletRequest` parameters to `OAuth2AuthorizationContext.getAttributes()`
    authorizedClientManager.setContextAttributesMapper(contextAttributesMapper())
    return authorizedClientManager
}

private fun contextAttributesMapper(): Function<OAuth2AuthorizeRequest, MutableMap<String, Any>> {
    return Function { authorizeRequest ->
        var contextAttributes: MutableMap<String, Any> = mutableMapOf()
        val servletRequest: HttpServletRequest = authorizeRequest.getAttribute(HttpServletRequest::class.java.name)
        val username = servletRequest.getParameter(OAuth2ParameterNames.USERNAME)
        val password = servletRequest.getParameter(OAuth2ParameterNames.PASSWORD)
        if (StringUtils.hasText(username) && StringUtils.hasText(password)) {
            contextAttributes = hashMapOf()

            // `PasswordOAuth2AuthorizedClientProvider` requires both attributes
            contextAttributes[OAuth2AuthorizationContext.USERNAME_ATTRIBUTE_NAME] = username
            contextAttributes[OAuth2AuthorizationContext.PASSWORD_ATTRIBUTE_NAME] = password
        }
        contextAttributes
    }
}

You may obtain the OAuth2AccessToken as follows:

Java
@Controller
public class OAuth2ClientController {

	@Autowired
	private OAuth2AuthorizedClientManager authorizedClientManager;

	@GetMapping("/")
	public String index(Authentication authentication,
						HttpServletRequest servletRequest,
						HttpServletResponse servletResponse) {

		OAuth2AuthorizeRequest authorizeRequest = OAuth2AuthorizeRequest.withClientRegistrationId("okta")
				.principal(authentication)
				.attributes(attrs -> {
					attrs.put(HttpServletRequest.class.getName(), servletRequest);
					attrs.put(HttpServletResponse.class.getName(), servletResponse);
				})
				.build();
		OAuth2AuthorizedClient authorizedClient = this.authorizedClientManager.authorize(authorizeRequest);

		OAuth2AccessToken accessToken = authorizedClient.getAccessToken();

		...

		return "index";
	}
}
Kotlin
@Controller
class OAuth2ClientController {
    @Autowired
    private lateinit var authorizedClientManager: OAuth2AuthorizedClientManager

    @GetMapping("/")
    fun index(authentication: Authentication?,
              servletRequest: HttpServletRequest,
              servletResponse: HttpServletResponse): String {
        val authorizeRequest: OAuth2AuthorizeRequest = OAuth2AuthorizeRequest.withClientRegistrationId("okta")
                .principal(authentication)
                .attributes(Consumer {
                    it[HttpServletRequest::class.java.name] = servletRequest
                    it[HttpServletResponse::class.java.name] = servletResponse
                })
                .build()
        val authorizedClient = authorizedClientManager.authorize(authorizeRequest)
        val accessToken: OAuth2AccessToken = authorizedClient.accessToken

        ...

        return "index"
    }
}
HttpServletRequest and HttpServletResponse are both OPTIONAL attributes. If not provided, it will default to ServletRequestAttributes using RequestContextHolder.getRequestAttributes().

JWT Bearer

Please refer to JSON Web Token (JWT) Profile for OAuth 2.0 Client Authentication and Authorization Grants for further details on the JWT Bearer grant.

Requesting an Access Token

Please refer to the Access Token Request/Response protocol flow for the JWT Bearer grant.

The default implementation of OAuth2AccessTokenResponseClient for the JWT Bearer grant is DefaultJwtBearerTokenResponseClient, which uses a RestOperations when requesting an access token at the Authorization Server’s Token Endpoint.

The DefaultJwtBearerTokenResponseClient is quite flexible as it allows you to customize the pre-processing of the Token Request and/or post-handling of the Token Response.

Customizing the Access Token Request

If you need to customize the pre-processing of the Token Request, you can provide DefaultJwtBearerTokenResponseClient.setRequestEntityConverter() with a custom Converter<JwtBearerGrantRequest, RequestEntity<?>>. The default implementation JwtBearerGrantRequestEntityConverter builds a RequestEntity representation of a OAuth 2.0 Access Token Request. However, providing a custom Converter, would allow you to extend the Token Request and add custom parameter(s).

To customize only the parameters of the request, you can provide JwtBearerGrantRequestEntityConverter.setParametersConverter() with a custom Converter<JwtBearerGrantRequest, MultiValueMap<String, String>> to completely override the parameters sent with the request. This is often simpler than constructing a RequestEntity directly.

If you prefer to only add additional parameters, you can provide JwtBearerGrantRequestEntityConverter.addParametersConverter() with a custom Converter<JwtBearerGrantRequest, MultiValueMap<String, String>> which constructs an aggregate Converter.

Customizing the Access Token Response

On the other end, if you need to customize the post-handling of the Token Response, you will need to provide DefaultJwtBearerTokenResponseClient.setRestOperations() with a custom configured RestOperations. The default RestOperations is configured as follows:

Java
RestTemplate restTemplate = new RestTemplate(Arrays.asList(
		new FormHttpMessageConverter(),
		new OAuth2AccessTokenResponseHttpMessageConverter()));

restTemplate.setErrorHandler(new OAuth2ErrorResponseErrorHandler());
Kotlin
val restTemplate = RestTemplate(listOf(
        FormHttpMessageConverter(),
        OAuth2AccessTokenResponseHttpMessageConverter()))

restTemplate.errorHandler = OAuth2ErrorResponseErrorHandler()
Spring MVC FormHttpMessageConverter is required as it’s used when sending the OAuth 2.0 Access Token Request.

OAuth2AccessTokenResponseHttpMessageConverter is a HttpMessageConverter for an OAuth 2.0 Access Token Response. You can provide OAuth2AccessTokenResponseHttpMessageConverter.setAccessTokenResponseConverter() with a custom Converter<Map<String, Object>, OAuth2AccessTokenResponse> that is used for converting the OAuth 2.0 Access Token Response parameters to an OAuth2AccessTokenResponse.

OAuth2ErrorResponseErrorHandler is a ResponseErrorHandler that can handle an OAuth 2.0 Error, eg. 400 Bad Request. It uses an OAuth2ErrorHttpMessageConverter for converting the OAuth 2.0 Error parameters to an OAuth2Error.

Whether you customize DefaultJwtBearerTokenResponseClient or provide your own implementation of OAuth2AccessTokenResponseClient, you’ll need to configure it as shown in the following example:

Java
// Customize
OAuth2AccessTokenResponseClient<JwtBearerGrantRequest> jwtBearerTokenResponseClient = ...

JwtBearerOAuth2AuthorizedClientProvider jwtBearerAuthorizedClientProvider = new JwtBearerOAuth2AuthorizedClientProvider();
jwtBearerAuthorizedClientProvider.setAccessTokenResponseClient(jwtBearerTokenResponseClient);

OAuth2AuthorizedClientProvider authorizedClientProvider =
		OAuth2AuthorizedClientProviderBuilder.builder()
				.provider(jwtBearerAuthorizedClientProvider)
				.build();

...

authorizedClientManager.setAuthorizedClientProvider(authorizedClientProvider);
Kotlin
// Customize
val jwtBearerTokenResponseClient: OAuth2AccessTokenResponseClient<JwtBearerGrantRequest> = ...

val jwtBearerAuthorizedClientProvider = JwtBearerOAuth2AuthorizedClientProvider()
jwtBearerAuthorizedClientProvider.setAccessTokenResponseClient(jwtBearerTokenResponseClient);

val authorizedClientProvider = OAuth2AuthorizedClientProviderBuilder.builder()
        .provider(jwtBearerAuthorizedClientProvider)
        .build()

...

authorizedClientManager.setAuthorizedClientProvider(authorizedClientProvider)

Using the Access Token

Given the following Spring Boot 2.x properties for an OAuth 2.0 Client registration:

spring:
  security:
    oauth2:
      client:
        registration:
          okta:
            client-id: okta-client-id
            client-secret: okta-client-secret
            authorization-grant-type: urn:ietf:params:oauth:grant-type:jwt-bearer
            scope: read
        provider:
          okta:
            token-uri: https://dev-1234.oktapreview.com/oauth2/v1/token

…​and the OAuth2AuthorizedClientManager @Bean:

Java
@Bean
public OAuth2AuthorizedClientManager authorizedClientManager(
		ClientRegistrationRepository clientRegistrationRepository,
		OAuth2AuthorizedClientRepository authorizedClientRepository) {

	JwtBearerOAuth2AuthorizedClientProvider jwtBearerAuthorizedClientProvider =
			new JwtBearerOAuth2AuthorizedClientProvider();

	OAuth2AuthorizedClientProvider authorizedClientProvider =
			OAuth2AuthorizedClientProviderBuilder.builder()
					.provider(jwtBearerAuthorizedClientProvider)
					.build();

	DefaultOAuth2AuthorizedClientManager authorizedClientManager =
			new DefaultOAuth2AuthorizedClientManager(
					clientRegistrationRepository, authorizedClientRepository);
	authorizedClientManager.setAuthorizedClientProvider(authorizedClientProvider);

	return authorizedClientManager;
}
Kotlin
@Bean
fun authorizedClientManager(
        clientRegistrationRepository: ClientRegistrationRepository,
        authorizedClientRepository: OAuth2AuthorizedClientRepository): OAuth2AuthorizedClientManager {
    val jwtBearerAuthorizedClientProvider = JwtBearerOAuth2AuthorizedClientProvider()
    val authorizedClientProvider = OAuth2AuthorizedClientProviderBuilder.builder()
            .provider(jwtBearerAuthorizedClientProvider)
            .build()
    val authorizedClientManager = DefaultOAuth2AuthorizedClientManager(
            clientRegistrationRepository, authorizedClientRepository)
    authorizedClientManager.setAuthorizedClientProvider(authorizedClientProvider)
    return authorizedClientManager
}

You may obtain the OAuth2AccessToken as follows:

Java
@RestController
public class OAuth2ResourceServerController {

	@Autowired
	private OAuth2AuthorizedClientManager authorizedClientManager;

	@GetMapping("/resource")
	public String resource(JwtAuthenticationToken jwtAuthentication) {
		OAuth2AuthorizeRequest authorizeRequest = OAuth2AuthorizeRequest.withClientRegistrationId("okta")
				.principal(jwtAuthentication)
				.build();
		OAuth2AuthorizedClient authorizedClient = this.authorizedClientManager.authorize(authorizeRequest);
		OAuth2AccessToken accessToken = authorizedClient.getAccessToken();

		...

	}
}
Kotlin
class OAuth2ResourceServerController {

    @Autowired
    private lateinit var authorizedClientManager: OAuth2AuthorizedClientManager

    @GetMapping("/resource")
    fun resource(jwtAuthentication: JwtAuthenticationToken?): String {
        val authorizeRequest: OAuth2AuthorizeRequest = OAuth2AuthorizeRequest.withClientRegistrationId("okta")
                .principal(jwtAuthentication)
                .build()
        val authorizedClient = authorizedClientManager.authorize(authorizeRequest)
        val accessToken: OAuth2AccessToken = authorizedClient.accessToken

        ...

    }
}
JwtBearerOAuth2AuthorizedClientProvider resolves the Jwt assertion via OAuth2AuthorizationContext.getPrincipal().getPrincipal() by default, hence the use of JwtAuthenticationToken in the preceding example.
If you need to resolve the Jwt assertion from a different source, you can provide JwtBearerOAuth2AuthorizedClientProvider.setJwtAssertionResolver() with a custom Function<OAuth2AuthorizationContext, Jwt>.