This version is still in development and is not considered stable yet. For the latest stable version, please use Spring Session 3.2.2!

Reactive Redis Indexed Configurations

To start using the Redis Indexed Web Session support, you need to add the following dependency to your project:

  • Maven

  • Gradle

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.springframework.session</groupId>
    <artifactId>spring-session-data-redis</artifactId>
</dependency>
implementation 'org.springframework.session:spring-session-data-redis'

And add the @EnableRedisIndexedWebSession annotation to a configuration class:

@Configuration
@EnableRedisIndexedWebSession
public class SessionConfig {
    // ...
}

That is it. Your application now has a reactive Redis backed Indexed Web Session support. Now that you have your application configured, you might want to start customizing things:

Serializing the Session using JSON

By default, Spring Session Data Redis uses Java Serialization to serialize the session attributes. Sometimes it might be problematic, especially when you have multiple applications that use the same Redis instance but have different versions of the same class. You can provide a RedisSerializer bean to customize how the session is serialized into Redis. Spring Data Redis provides the GenericJackson2JsonRedisSerializer that serializes and deserializes objects using Jackson’s ObjectMapper.

Configuring the RedisSerializer
@Configuration
public class SessionConfig implements BeanClassLoaderAware {

	private ClassLoader loader;

	/**
	 * Note that the bean name for this bean is intentionally
	 * {@code springSessionDefaultRedisSerializer}. It must be named this way to override
	 * the default {@link RedisSerializer} used by Spring Session.
	 */
	@Bean
	public RedisSerializer<Object> springSessionDefaultRedisSerializer() {
		return new GenericJackson2JsonRedisSerializer(objectMapper());
	}

	/**
	 * Customized {@link ObjectMapper} to add mix-in for class that doesn't have default
	 * constructors
	 * @return the {@link ObjectMapper} to use
	 */
	private ObjectMapper objectMapper() {
		ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
		mapper.registerModules(SecurityJackson2Modules.getModules(this.loader));
		return mapper;
	}

	/*
	 * @see
	 * org.springframework.beans.factory.BeanClassLoaderAware#setBeanClassLoader(java.lang
	 * .ClassLoader)
	 */
	@Override
	public void setBeanClassLoader(ClassLoader classLoader) {
		this.loader = classLoader;
	}

}

The above code snippet is using Spring Security, therefore we are creating a custom ObjectMapper that uses Spring Security’s Jackson modules. If you do not need Spring Security Jackson modules, you can inject your application’s ObjectMapper bean and use it like so:

@Bean
public RedisSerializer<Object> springSessionDefaultRedisSerializer(ObjectMapper objectMapper) {
    return new GenericJackson2JsonRedisSerializer(objectMapper);
}

The RedisSerializer bean name must be springSessionDefaultRedisSerializer so it does not conflict with other RedisSerializer beans used by Spring Data Redis. If a different name is provided it won’t be picked up by Spring Session.

Specifying a Different Namespace

It is not uncommon to have multiple applications that use the same Redis instance or to want to keep the session data separated from other data stored in Redis. For that reason, Spring Session uses a namespace (defaults to spring:session) to keep the session data separated if needed.

You can specify the namespace by setting the redisNamespace property in the @EnableRedisIndexedWebSession annotation:

  • Specifying a different namespace

@Configuration
@EnableRedisIndexedWebSession(redisNamespace = "spring:session:myapplication")
public class SessionConfig {
    // ...
}

Understanding How Spring Session Cleans Up Expired Sessions

Spring Session relies on Redis Keyspace Events to clean up expired sessions. More specifically, it listens to events emitted to the __keyevent@*__:expired and __keyevent@*__:del channels and resolve the session id based on the key that was destroyed.

As an example, let’s imagine that we have a session with id 1234 and that the session is set to expire in 30 minutes. When the expiration time is reached, Redis will emit an event to the __keyevent@*__:expired channel with the message spring:session:sessions:expires:1234 which is the key that expired. Spring Session will then resolve the session id (1234) from the key and delete all the related session keys from Redis.

One problem with relying on Redis expiration exclusively is that Redis makes no guarantee of when the expired event will be fired if the key has not been accessed. For additional details see How Redis expires keys in the Redis documentation. To circumvent the fact that expired events are not guaranteed to happen we can ensure that each key is accessed when it is expected to expire. This means that if the TTL is expired on the key, Redis will remove the key and fire the expired event when we try to access the key. For this reason, each session expiration is also tracked by storing the session id in a sorted set ranked by its expiration time. This allows a background task to access the potentially expired sessions to ensure that Redis expired events are fired in a more deterministic fashion. For example:

ZADD spring:session:sessions:expirations "1.702402961162E12" "648377f7-c76f-4f45-b847-c0268bb48381"

We do not explicitly delete the keys since in some instances there may be a race condition that incorrectly identifies a key as expired when it is not. Short of using distributed locks (which would kill our performance) there is no way to ensure the consistency of the expiration mapping. By simply accessing the key, we ensure that the key is only removed if the TTL on that key is expired.

By default, Spring Session will retrieve up to 100 expired sessions every 60 seconds. If you want to configure how often the cleanup task runs, please refer to the Changing the Frequency of the Session Cleanup section.

Configuring Redis to Send Keyspace Events

By default, Spring Session tries to configure Redis to send keyspace events using the ConfigureNotifyKeyspaceEventsReactiveAction which, in turn, might set the notify-keyspace-events configuration property to Egx. However, this strategy will not work if the Redis instance has been properly secured. In that case, the Redis instance should be configured externally and a Bean of type ConfigureReactiveRedisAction.NO_OP should be exposed to disable the autoconfiguration.

@Bean
public ConfigureReactiveRedisAction configureReactiveRedisAction() {
    return ConfigureReactiveRedisAction.NO_OP;
}

Changing the Frequency of the Session Cleanup

Depending on your application’s needs, you might want to change the frequency of the session cleanup. To do that, you can expose a ReactiveSessionRepositoryCustomizer<ReactiveRedisIndexedSessionRepository> bean and set the cleanupInterval property:

@Bean
public ReactiveSessionRepositoryCustomizer<ReactiveRedisIndexedSessionRepository> reactiveSessionRepositoryCustomizer() {
    return (sessionRepository) -> sessionRepository.setCleanupInterval(Duration.ofSeconds(30));
}

You can also set invoke disableCleanupTask() to disable the cleanup task.

@Bean
public ReactiveSessionRepositoryCustomizer<ReactiveRedisIndexedSessionRepository> reactiveSessionRepositoryCustomizer() {
    return (sessionRepository) -> sessionRepository.disableCleanupTask();
}

Taking Control Over the Cleanup Task

Sometimes, the default cleanup task might not be enough for your application’s needs. You might want to adopt a different strategy to clean up expired sessions. Since you know that the session ids are stored in a sorted set under the key spring:session:sessions:expirations and ranked by their expiration time, you can disable the default cleanup task and provide your own strategy. For example:

@Component
public class SessionEvicter {

    private ReactiveRedisOperations<String, String> redisOperations;

    @Scheduled
    public Mono<Void> cleanup() {
        Instant now = Instant.now();
        Instant oneMinuteAgo = now.minus(Duration.ofMinutes(1));
        Range<Double> range = Range.closed((double) oneMinuteAgo.toEpochMilli(), (double) now.toEpochMilli());
        Limit limit = Limit.limit().count(1000);
        return this.redisOperations.opsForZSet().reverseRangeByScore("spring:session:sessions:expirations", range, limit)
                // do something with the session ids
                .then();
    }

}

Listening to Session Events

Often times it is valuable to react to session events, for example, you might want to do some kind of processing depending on the session lifecycle.

You configure your application to listen to SessionCreatedEvent, SessionDeletedEvent and SessionExpiredEvent events. There are a few ways to listen to application events in Spring, for this example we are going to use the @EventListener annotation.

@Component
public class SessionEventListener {

    @EventListener
    public Mono<Void> processSessionCreatedEvent(SessionCreatedEvent event) {
        // do the necessary work
    }

    @EventListener
    public Mono<Void> processSessionDeletedEvent(SessionDeletedEvent event) {
        // do the necessary work
    }

    @EventListener
    public Mono<Void> processSessionExpiredEvent(SessionExpiredEvent event) {
        // do the necessary work
    }

}